Apartment plants

Benjiamin leaf loss

Benjiamin leaf loss



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Question: Benjiamin leaf loss


I have a Benjiamin for two years, it loses its leaves and is therefore emptied. I flared it, it is positioned in front of a window that gives it light but that does not beat the sun. What can I do there is a fertilizer that helps it a little to thicken ... I admit it wrapped up I was wrong with the dosage of water but now I think I understood it.
thank you very much
federica

Answer: benjiamin leaf loss


Dear Federica,
the Ficus benjamin are among the most cultivated plants in the apartment, even if in nature they are real majestic trees; often these plants lose their foliage, and the reasons are various:
- errors in watering: the ficus love regular watering, but it is good to let the soil dry perfectly between two waterings; when in doubt, it is better to water it less once rather than one too many.
- air blows: the sudden change in temperature often causes the loss of most of the foliage; avoid exposing our plant to cold drafts.
- dry climate: the heating system and the air conditioner very much dry the air in the house; the ficus loves a fairly humid climate, it is therefore good to raise the environmental humidity by vaporizing the foliage, or leaving the plant in a vase cover, with some centimeters of clay expanded on the bottom, always wet.
- fertilizations: above all in spring the ficus produce a thick mass of new leaves and branches; the consumption of mineral salts is high, therefore either they are repotted at least every 2 years, using a good rich soil, or they are fertilized regularly, from March until September, every 2 weeks, using a good fertilizer for green plants.
- brightness: in nature the ficus grow in open areas, where they receive excellent brightness; plants grown in dark places tend to fade over time, or lose foliage in the lower part of the stem.